Artisan Tea

tea terminology

The world of tea boasts a rich vocabulary beyond simply “black” or “green”.

We have compiled a glossary to help demystify some of the lesser known words and phrases.

Our range of Artisan Teas is presented to you in 50g pouches or 1kg packets

Artisan Tea - 50g Artisan Tea - 1Kg

artisan tea

artisan tea

Artisan tea refers to high-quality, loose-leaf tea crafted with meticulous attention to detail.

Here’s what sets it apart:

Focus on Quality: Unlike commercially produced tea bags, artisan teas use whole or minimally processed leaves, ensuring the freshest and most flavourful ingredients.

Small-Batch Production: Small producers often source their leaves directly from specific regions or farms, allowing them to control quality and celebrate unique growing conditions.

Handcrafted Techniques: Many artisan teas involve traditional or manual processing methods, like hand-picking leaves or using specialised rolling techniques, to enhance their flavour and aroma.

Unique Blends: While some focus on single-estate teas, artisans may also create unique blends using premium leaves, flowers, herbs, or spices, resulting in a wider range of flavour profiles.

The result is a far cry from your average tea bag. Artisan tea offers a more immersive experience, with each cup revealing a symphony of aromas and tastes that reflect the dedication and artistry behind its creation.

caffeine and theine

caffeine and theine are actually the same thing!

There can be some confusion around the terms, but theine is simply another name for caffeine, specifically when referring to the caffeine found in tea.

Here’s a breakdown:

Same Molecule: Both theine and caffeine have the same chemical structure and effects on the body, acting as stimulants in the central nervous system.

Historical Term: Theine was the first name given to caffeine when it was isolated from tea leaves in the early 1800s. Later, when caffeine was discovered in coffee beans as well, the term “caffeine” became more widely used.

Tea vs. Coffee Experience: While theine and caffeine are the same molecule, the experience you get from tea can differ from coffee. This is because tea leaves contain other compounds like L-theanine, an amino acid, which can create a more calming and focused effect compared to the jittery feeling sometimes associated with coffee.

green tea

green tea

Green tea is a type of tea made from the leaves of the Camellia sinensis plant, but unlike black or oolong tea, it undergoes minimal processing. This difference in processing is key to green tea’s unique properties:

Fresh Flavour: Green tea leaves are not oxidised, which means they retain their natural green colour and a fresh, grassy flavour profile. This stands in contrast to black tea, which goes through an oxidation process that results in a stronger, more robust taste.

High in Antioxidants: Because green tea isn’t oxidised, it retains a high concentration of beneficial antioxidants called catechins. These antioxidants are thought to offer a variety of health benefits.

Varieties: Green tea comes in many varieties, each with its own distinct flavour and aroma. Some popular types include sencha, matcha, longjing, and gunpowder green tea.

herbal tea

herbal tea

Herbal tea, also sometimes called a tisane (ti-zahn), is a caffeine-free beverage made by steeping various plant parts in hot water. Unlike true tea (black, green and so on.) that comes from the Camellia sinensis plant, herbal tea embraces a wider world of botanical ingredients:

Botanical Bounty: Instead of leaves from a single plant, herbal tea can be brewed from dried fruits (like hibiscus or rosehip), flowers (chamomile, lavender), spices (ginger, cinnamon), or even herbs (mint, peppermint).

Flavour Frenzy: The variety of ingredients translates to a vast array of possible flavours, from the calming chamomile to the invigorating ginger. The variety means that herbal teas can offer something for every taste bud.

Potential Health Benefits: Herbal teas have been used for centuries in traditional medicine for their potential health benefits. Chamomile is known for its ability to help relaxation, ginger for aiding digestion, and peppermint for soothing an upset stomach. (It’s important to note that the scientific evidence for these benefits can vary.)

So, next time you’re looking for a warm, soothing drink or a flavourful caffeine-free alternative, consider exploring the wonderful world of herbal tea.

pu-erh tea

pu-erh tea

Pu-erh tea is a unique type of fermented tea originating from Yunnan Province in China.

This is what makes it special:

Fermentation: Unlike most teas, Pu-erh undergoes a microbial fermentation process after drying and rolling. This process, similar to aging wine, allows the tea leaves to develop a richer and more complex flavour profile over time.

Two Varieties: Pu-erh comes in two main types: raw (sheng) and ripe (shu). Raw Pu-erh is minimally processed and ages naturally, developing a lighter, earthier flavour that becomes smoother with age. Ripe Pu-erh undergoes a faster, controlled fermentation process, resulting in a darker colour, stronger aroma, and a smooth, earthy taste.

Aging Potential: High-quality Pu-erh, especially raw varieties, can be aged for decades or even centuries, increasing in value and complexity of flavour. This makes them a prized possession for tea connoisseurs.

 

rooibos

rooibos

Rooibos (pronounced roy-boss) is a plant native to South Africa and the base ingredient for a popular caffeine-free herbal tea.

Here’s a quick rundown:

Plant Origin: Rooibos comes from the Aspalathus linearis shrub, which grows primarily in the fynbos biome of South Africa.

Herbal Tea, Not True Tea: Unlike black tea or green tea, rooibos isn’t related to the Camellia sinensis plant. Rooibos is the herbal infusion made from the dried leaves of the rooibos shrub.

Flavour Profile: Rooibos tea has a naturally sweet, slightly earthy flavour. Some compare it to yerba mate or tobacco, but much less intense

Preparation and Enjoyment: Rooibos leaves are brewed similarly to true tea, and it can be enjoyed hot or iced, plain or with added milk and sugar, or other flavourings.

theine and caffine

theine and caffeine are actually the same thing!

There can be some confusion around the terms, but theine is simply another name for caffeine, specifically when referring to the caffeine found in tea.

Here’s a breakdown:

Same Molecule: Both theine and caffeine have the same chemical structure and effects on the body, acting as stimulants in the central nervous system.

Historical Term: Theine was the first name given to caffeine when it was isolated from tea leaves in the early 1800s. Later, when caffeine was discovered in coffee beans as well, the term “caffeine” became more widely used.

Tea vs. Coffee Experience: While theine and caffeine are the same molecule, the experience you get from tea can differ from coffee. This is because tea leaves contain other compounds like L-theanine, an amino acid, which can create a more calming and focused effect compared to the jittery feeling sometimes associated with coffee.